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Hong Kong testing anti-bacterial nano-coating in subways!

November 5, 2009

Hong Kong is now testing an anti-bacterial silver-titanium dioxide nanoparticle coating on surfaces in its subways. Expect to see the same in London’s tube in the near future.

With news of powerful flu strains like the avian flu and hand-transmissible diseases such as colds, public transportation links operators in Asia and Europe have considered using a new disinfectant in their undergrounds. Many surfaces that people touch every day in the tube, as the London subway system is called, also carry thousands of bacteria and germs.

Hong Kong is among the first cities to test one of the latest anti-flu products, nano silver-titianium dioxide coating.. It is applied to all surfaces inside a subway car. The preliminary tests conducted in Hong Kong show that the disinfectant reduces the amount of bacteria by 60 percent.

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Bullet-proof T-shirts use Carbon Nanotubes!

November 5, 2009

Nanowerk reports that a team led by Professor Liangchi Zhang at the University of Sydney is investigating ballistic-resistance materials using carbon nanotubes.

“Especially in making bullet-proof vests, shields, and explosion proof blankets,” said Zhang, “the best protective material will have a high level of elastic storage energy that will cause the projectile to bounce off or be deflected.”

In his experiments, Zhang found that carbon nanotubes could be resilient to projectiles traveling at speeds of 200-1400 meters per second. The velocity of a typical rifle bullet is between 180 and 1500 meters per second. (photo of non-nano bullet-proof t-shirt LBA International)

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Nanotechnology in the Aluminum Industry

November 5, 2009

Alcoa & RUSNANO have signed a memorandum of understanding to explore ways of using nanotechnology in the aluminium industry, specifically for offshore oil and gas drilling, high-efficiency power transmission, next-generation lighting, energy-efficient buildings and transportation systems and green packaging.

“This partnership with RUSNANO offers great promise for Alcoa and the entire aluminum industry,” says Alcoa president and CEO Klaus Kleinfeld. “Building on our existing investment and presence in Russia, we are proud to be a partner of the leading Russian nanotechnology institution.”

“I am confident that the MoU that we signed with Alcoa, one of the global leaders in the production of aluminum and aluminum products, is a first step on the road to a very beneficial joint cooperation that will heavily rely on both parties’ expansive knowledge and expertise,” says RUSNANO CEO Anatoly Chubais. “With Alcoa, we are looking forward to the implementation of the concrete projects of bringing nanotechnologies’ advantage for the creation of the new generation aluminum products for the Russian and export markets.”

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Nanotube and stem cell cocktail heals damaged brain tissue!

October 26, 2009

Researchers at Brown University have injected a cocktail of carbon nanofibers and stem cells directly into the brains of rats. And as if that wasn’t enough, the rats had already suffered strokes. The result? The nanotube and stem cell cocktail healed neural tissue damaged by the stroke.

Working in collaboration with researchers at Yonsei University, Seoul, Brown Professor Thomas J. Webster combined neural stem cells with either hydrophobic or hydrophilic carbon nanofibers and injected the cocktail into damaged regions of the brains of rats that had suffered a simulated stroke. After a few weeks, both types of nanofibers with stem cells promoted the growth of new neural tissue. On their own, neither nanofibers nor stem cells triggered neural tissue regeneration.

Webster attributes the mixture’s regenerative power to the fibers’ favorable interaction with laminin, a key protein for promoting stem cell differentiation into neurons. Webster also thinks the nanofibers’ ability to conduct electricity could help wire the neurons to one another.

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Nanotech bio-battery to power artificial retina

October 26, 2009

A multidisciplinary team is developing a nano-size battery that one day could be implanted in the eye to power an artificial retina.

The scientists at the University of Illinois will design, model, synthesize, and fabricate nanomedical devices based on natural and synthetic ion transporters – proteins that control ion motion across the membranes of every living cell.

The first task will be to design a class of devices for generating Electric powerlinks – bio-batteries – for a wide array of implantable devices, starting with an artificial retina that has already been developed at the Doheny Eye Institute at the University of Southern California. The artificial retina and accompanying nanobattery will be used to correct certain types of macular degeneration.

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Nanotech market to top $1 trillion by 2010

October 26, 2009

A new report “World Nanotechnology Market – An Industry Update (2005)”, predicts that nanotechnology will exceed $1 trillion in the world market by the end of 2010. Government spending on nanotech R&D has increased to over $3 billion per annum, and venture capitalists have increased their investments six times over the previous two years. Companies like Intel, IBM, DuPont, 3M, general electric, Samsung and Hitachi, for instance, spent $3.8 billion on nanotech in 2004.

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Nanotea!

October 8, 2009

Prepared with nano-technology, the nano-tea can release effectively all the excellent essences of the tea, thus boosting the adsorption (adsorbing viruses, free radicals, cholesterol and blood fat) and annihilation of viruses through penetration so that a good supplement of selenium can be achieved and the selenium supplement function can be increased by 10 times.

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